Stone Town

Stone Town                             
Portuguese invasion and control of the Swahili Coast in the late 16th century ended the golden age of the archipelago, although the Omani Arabs returned to power less than a century later. Today, many of the winding streets and high townhouses of old Stone Town remain unchanged and visitors can walk between the sultan’s palace, the House of Wonders, the Portuguese fort and gardens, the merchants’ houses, and the Turkish baths of the old city. Day-long spice tours to working plantations offer visitors the chance to observe the cultivation of cloves, vanilla, nutmeg, cinnamon, and other spices that have made the island famous. The port city of Stone Town dominates the west coast, and although the beaches of Mangapwani, where slave caves are visible at low tide and nearby Bububu are less than half an hour’s drive away, a night or two spent on the east or north cost is well worth the extra hour it takes to drive there. That said, the Chole Island Marine Park just off Stone Town – and nearby Prison, Grave, and Snake Islands – make a refreshing day-trip and a good break from exploring the winding passageways of the old city.


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Stone Town                   
A "World Heritage Site", gained its name from the many large multi-story "stone" buildings. These structures are actually constructed with coral, limestone and mortar. The town has hardly changed in 200 years. The historic charm of its winding alleys, bustling bazaars, wonderful architecture and brass-studded & carved wooden doors will mesmerize you.
Over the years, thousands of people have been attracted to the East African Coastal cities, to witness the evolution of the Swahili culture among other things. Stone Town is undoubtedly its most unique landmark. There is much to see and do in Stone Town. You can simply wander through the streets or visit the market, Livingstone’s house, the Peace Memorial Museum and the Palace Museum.